When the U.S. invaded Cuba during the Spanish-Amercan War of 1898, Tampa served as the major embarkation point for the troops.  Military mismanagement from the War Department down soon became evident, but getting the troops onto transports in the overwhelmed Port Tampa was a genuine ordeal.  Taking initiave that bordered on criminality, Teddy Roosevelt was so keen on getting to Cuba that he practically forced his way to onto a ship at gunpoint.  He left his horses behind in the mad scramble to be the first afloat.  Here, the 71st New York Volunteer Regiment waits for a ship.  They would spend two weeks at sea to cover the short distance to Siboney, Cuba.

When the U.S. invaded Cuba during the Spanish-Amercan War of 1898, Tampa served as the major embarkation point for the troops.  Military mismanagement from the War Department down soon became evident, but getting the troops onto transports in the overwhelmed Port Tampa was a genuine ordeal.  Taking initiave that bordered on criminality, Teddy Roosevelt was so keen on getting to Cuba that he practically forced his way to onto a ship at gunpoint.  He left his horses behind in the mad scramble to be the first afloat.  Here, the 71st New York Volunteer Regiment waits for a ship.  They would spend two weeks at sea to cover the short distance to Siboney, Cuba.

H. W. Pullen, The fight at Dame Europa’s school : showing how the German boy thrashed the French boy; and how the English boy looked on (New York: F. B. Felt & Co., 1871). With illustrations by Thomas Nast.

A didactic satire of European countries during the Franco-Prussian War. The illustrations by Nast, which depict the childlike portrayals of the European countries in Pullen’s text, are wood engravings.

This editorial cartoon appeared in The Oracle, USF’s student newspaper, in 1985. At the time, USF students and faculty were engaged in demonstrations to persuade the university not to invest in any companies doing business in Apartheid-era South Africa.  Vice President of the USF Foundation, Joe Busta, is depicted as being more interested in money than education or justice, thus changing USF’s slogan to “Accent on Earning.”  Busta and USF President John Lott Brown openly resisted divesting for over two years while students and faculty involvement in the issue continued to grow.  Finally, in 1987, the USF Foundation grudgingly complied, but President Brown’s administration had been permanently tarnished in the eyes of the people he served.  A new effort by Palestinian Students to divest in companies doing business in the occupied lands of Israel has run into a flat refusal to consider it by the USF Board of Trustees.

This editorial cartoon appeared in The Oracle, USF’s student newspaper, in 1985. At the time, USF students and faculty were engaged in demonstrations to persuade the university not to invest in any companies doing business in Apartheid-era South Africa.  Vice President of the USF Foundation, Joe Busta, is depicted as being more interested in money than education or justice, thus changing USF’s slogan to “Accent on Earning.”  Busta and USF President John Lott Brown openly resisted divesting for over two years while students and faculty involvement in the issue continued to grow.  Finally, in 1987, the USF Foundation grudgingly complied, but President Brown’s administration had been permanently tarnished in the eyes of the people he served.  A new effort by Palestinian Students to divest in companies doing business in the occupied lands of Israel has run into a flat refusal to consider it by the USF Board of Trustees.

The Indestructible One Syllable Primer: For Home and School Use, One Hundred Illustrations (New York: McLoughlin Brothers, 1878).

It’s back-to-school day here at USF, and in honor of the new school year, we found this primer from 1878. Unlike its Puritan ancestors, which were strictly morally didactic, this primer juxtaposes moral lessons (do not lie!) with more entertaining illustrations of animals. This primer is “indestructibly” printed on linen rather than the more easily ripped paper.