It’s banned books week, the week in September that American libraries, bookstores, teachers, and publishers celebrate the freedom to read. Banned books week was established in 1982 in response to a rising number of challenges to books in schools. All week, we will be posting images of books that have been censored, challenged, or banned in America.

This letter from Christopher Collier, one of the authors of My Brother Sam is Dead (1974), tells how Scholastic Press published an expurgated version of the novel. The version at top left is the revised edition; the version at top right is a restored version published after the Colliers discovered the changes. Both copies are part of USF’s Hipple Collection of Young Adult Literature.

It’s banned books week, the week in September that American libraries, bookstores, teachers, and publishers celebrate the freedom to read. Banned books week was established in 1982 in response to a rising number of challenges to books in schools. All week, we will be posting images of books that have been censored, challenged, or banned in America.
First up, Ray Bradbury’s Farenheit 451 (New York: Ballantine Books, 1953), a book about book banning that has itself frequently been banned or censored. This is a first edition of the novel; a hardback edition wasn’t published until after the paperback was released.

It’s banned books week, the week in September that American libraries, bookstores, teachers, and publishers celebrate the freedom to read. Banned books week was established in 1982 in response to a rising number of challenges to books in schools. All week, we will be posting images of books that have been censored, challenged, or banned in America.

First up, Ray Bradbury’s Farenheit 451 (New York: Ballantine Books, 1953), a book about book banning that has itself frequently been banned or censored. This is a first edition of the novel; a hardback edition wasn’t published until after the paperback was released.

Scroll of birthday haiku for Robert Massmann’s natal celebration, by Frank Ankenbrand (Haddonfield, N.J. : F. Ankenbrand, 1967).

A miniature (2.5 cm tall) scroll, featuring English-language haiku. When unrolled, the scroll measures 120 cm long. Normally, though, the scroll is stored rolled in its cute pink and clear plastic egg.



In Tampa’s early history, the poor African American neighborhood roughly between downtown and Ybor City was known as the Scrub.  Tampa’s City Fathers always thought the Scrub was a model black neighborhood, but a study by Florida Urban League executive Benjamin Mays revealed the shameful conditions there in 1927.  This photograph shows an outhouse and water pump placed much too close together.  For more information, see the report Mays assembled “A Study of Negro Life in Tampa,” published in 1928.

In Tampa’s early history, the poor African American neighborhood roughly between downtown and Ybor City was known as the Scrub.  Tampa’s City Fathers always thought the Scrub was a model black neighborhood, but a study by Florida Urban League executive Benjamin Mays revealed the shameful conditions there in 1927.  This photograph shows an outhouse and water pump placed much too close together.  For more information, see the report Mays assembled “A Study of Negro Life in Tampa,” published in 1928.

For many years, Florida Trend magazine’s Golden Spoon Awards were coveted prizes for restaurants in the Sunshine State.  Until the mid-1970s, when a food editor took on the task, Trend’s readers chose the winners of the Golden Spoon Awards.  Bern and Gert Laxer undoubtedly had good taste in food, but their taste in interior decorating was indisputably poor.  By the 1970s, Bern’s Steakhouse in Tampa had developed from a small bar into a fine steak house with an ambience that has often been described as bordello chic. 

For many years, Florida Trend magazine’s Golden Spoon Awards were coveted prizes for restaurants in the Sunshine State.  Until the mid-1970s, when a food editor took on the task, Trend’s readers chose the winners of the Golden Spoon Awards.  Bern and Gert Laxer undoubtedly had good taste in food, but their taste in interior decorating was indisputably poor.  By the 1970s, Bern’s Steakhouse in Tampa had developed from a small bar into a fine steak house with an ambience that has often been described as bordello chic. 

New additions to our Children’s Literature Collection: the Bobbsey Twins, as seen by the 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.

Hope, L. L. (1962). The Bobbsey twins and the goldfish mystery. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Hope, L. L. (1945). The Bobbsey twins at mystery mansion. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Hope, L. L. (1933). The Bobbsey twins on an airplane trip. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Hope, L. L. (1951). The Bobbsey twins’ own little railroad. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Hope, L. L. (1964). The Bobbsey twins and the Greek hat mystery. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

Hope, L. L. (1963). The Bobbsey twins and the big river mystery. New York: Grosset & Dunlap.

At the height of the counterculture in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Church of the Apocalypse published a short-lived alternative student newspaper to USF’s The Oracle.  Named The Eye of the Beast, the newspaper kept students informed of local political and cultural events while tapping into the national student movement.  In September of 1970, the Church urged students to get “Back to Struggle” rather than simply returning to their classes.

At the height of the counterculture in the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Church of the Apocalypse published a short-lived alternative student newspaper to USF’s The Oracle.  Named The Eye of the Beast, the newspaper kept students informed of local political and cultural events while tapping into the national student movement.  In September of 1970, the Church urged students to get “Back to Struggle” rather than simply returning to their classes.